Tag: identity

The newest issue of the Dangling Modifier is now live!

We’re happy to announce that The Dangling Modifier Spring 2018 (Volume 24:2) is now available! This edition, entitled Culture & Language: Student Sovereignty in Expression and Identity, was hosted by the Center and edited by five of our own Michigan State University Writing Center undergraduate consultants, including:

 

Caitlin Vandermeulen

Cailin Haggerty

Grace Beltowski

Sarah Liddy

Gaby Abalo

 

Thank you for all your hard work, and for making this issue possible! Congratulations!

Becca’s ECWCA Experience

Written by Becca Meyer

Never having been to a conference like this, I wasn’t quite sure what to expect or if I’d even like to present at one but I ended up walking away with some cool ideas to research for next year’s conference. Somewhat unintentionally, each panel I went to had a similar theme: inclusion, identity, and where a writing center fits within each of those. I went into each session with an open mind and took each one I attended as an opportunity to apply new ideas to how I view inclusion and identity from a personal standpoint as well as how I can implement those ideas as a consultant. 

There were two presentations in particular that really got me thinking were Writing Centers and Disclosure: Accommodating Mental Health Characteristics Through Therapeutic Writing by some consultants from Ohio State and if a brown girl speaks in the writing center, does she really make a sound?- on the daily reality of having our authority questioned and how we heal by Raquel, Shana, and Marie from our very own writing center. 

 Something I liked about the former of the presentations was their suggestion to include a therapeutic writing room in the writing center. This would be a space for anyone to come in and journal or draw or just decompress between classes on a long day. I find it important to have a space like this because, for someone like me whose surrounding physical environment has a profound impact on thoughts and feelings, it can be hard to get in the right space to write. The latter of the presentations resonated with me from a personal standpoint. In a round table discussion, we talked about instances of negative interactions simply due to skin color and gender. Being new to The Writing Center this semester, I haven’t yet encountered any discriminatory situations so it hadn’t really occurred to me that some clients might come in with a racist or superior attitude because I look different than them. We ended up having a great dialogue about how to handle clients or really anyone who challenges the spirit of inclusion and community in the writing center and how to be supportive of our colleagues who do face instances of discrimination.

 

What Was the Point of This?: The Emerging Scholar Series

When I started this Emerging Scholar series, I was having an existential crisis, questioning daily my place within the academy. I wasn’t so much questioning my place within the academy intellectually, as much as I was questioning my place in the academy in terms of whether or not my work, and by proxy I, was valued. Most scholars I encounter tell me my feelings are normal and everyone has to prove the value of their work to someone, somewhere. I do not disagree that all scholars have to prove the value of their research; however, all scholars are not Black lesbians. All scholars do not live a “colored” life. All scholars do not have to constantly prove their worth and their value (as humans) on a daily basis.

Because of the struggles I faced proving myself and my work publishable (translation: valuable) in the academy—three rejection letters and counting, I decided I wanted to write about the difficulties I had in this journey to becoming a “scholar” and how the entire process made me feel that I, as a Black woman, had to prove I mattered. Every rejection and every insistence from a colleague, mentor, or instructor to give more of myself, to do more with myself, felt as though I was being asked to do more, being pushed more. However, the rejections from journals felt racial, homophobic, and sexist. When I submit on the lack of Black lesbian images and work in Queer Studies, I hear, “YOU have to PROVE DISCIPLINARY EXIGENCY.” (Translation: Black women don’t matter.) When I submit research suggesting Black women would not favor a National Language Policy, I was told, “This is NOT RESEARCH. You just have the OPINION of BLACK WOMEN.” (Translation: Black women don’t matter.) And while I understand that some of these instances are just the wrong journal or the right journal but the wrong time, this type of dismissive rhetoric placed upon my body by other bodies from the dominant culture feels raced, and this feeling is real and it’s valid.

Yes, one day I will be published. Yes, one day I will be the scholar who intellectually pushes her students and not the student who is intellectually pushed. But in this moment, I am neither of those things. In this moment, I am chasing my dream. I do not know what the stories on the other side of publishing, research, and teaching will be for me once I experience them. However, I doubt the feeling of having to constantly prove I matter will wane, if anything, and most likely, it will intensify. I wrote this series to understand where and who I am in this moment (feeling unappreciated), so I know who I can be in the next moment (a Black lesbian scholar that matters). Because Black women matter.